M. Morán: ECJ VALE C‑378/10, Transfer of the seat of a company governed by the law of a Member State to another Member State with a change in the national law applicable – Transferencia de sede a otro Estado Miembro con modificación de la ley nacional aplicablectividad – Transformación transfronteriza

ECJ VALE, Case C-378/10 – TJUE VALE, Asunto C-378/10

TRENDING TOPIC: Freedom of establisment, cross-border conversion –

Libertad de establecimiento, transformación transfronteriza

SUMMARY

The present reference for a preliminary ruling concerns the issue of the cross-border movement of companies within the single market. The reference made to the Court relates to the interpretation of Articles 43 EC and 48 EC (now Articles 49 TFEU and 54 TFEU) and has been lodged in the context of non-contentious proceedings following the cross-border transfer of a company governed by Italian law to Hungary by means of the transfer of its seat, entailing its removal from the Italian commercial register, a change in the applicable law and its reincorporation as a company governed by Hungarian law which claims to be the universal successor to the Italian company.

 The Hungarian legislation at issue in this case permits a company incorporated in Hungary to be registered in the national commercial register as the predecessor in law of a company. By contrast, the legislation does not permit such registration if the predecessor is a company formed in another Member State, as is the case in the main proceedings.

The present case is one in a line of cases before the Court concerning European company law, such as Daily Mail and General Trust, Centros, ÜberseeringInspire ArtSEVIC Systems and Cartesio. (2) However, it introduces a new element as the Court is asked to give a ruling on the extent of a host Member State’s obligations in the case of the ‘cross-border reincorporation of a limited company’. (3)

THE DISPUTE IN THE MAIN PROCEEDINGS AND THE QUESTIONS REFERRED FOR A PRELIMINARY RULING

VALE Costruzioni Srl (a limited liability company governed by Italian law) (‘VALE Costruzioni’), established on 27 September 2000, was registered in the Rome (Italy) commercial register on 16 November 2000. O n 3 February 2006, VALE Costruzioni asked to be removed from that register on the ground that it intended to transfer its seat and its business to Hungary, and to discontinue business in Italy. In accordance with that request, the authority responsible for the commercial register in Rome deleted the entry relating to VALE Costruzioni from the register on 13 February 2006. As is apparent from the file, an entry was made in the register under the heading ‘Removal and transfer of seat’, stating that ‘the company ha[d] moved to Hungary’.

 Given that the company established originally in Italy under Italian law had decided to transfer its seat to Hungary and to operate there in accordance with Hungarian law, on 14 November 2006, the director of VALE Costruzioni and another natural person adopted, in Rome, the articles of association of VALE Építési kft (a limited liability company governed by Hungarian law) (‘VALE Építési’), with a view to registration in the Hungarian commercial register. Moreover, the share capital was paid up to the extent required under Hungarian law for registration.

  On 19 January 2007, the representative of VALE Építési applied to the Fővárosi Bíróság (Budapest Metropolitan Court), acting as the Cégbíróság (Commercial Court), to register the company in accordance with Hungarian law. In the application, the representative stated that VALE Costruzioni was the predecessor in law to VALE Építési.

  The Fővárosi Bíróság, acting as a commercial court at first instance, rejected the application for registration. VALE Építési lodged an appeal before the Fővárosi Ítélőtábla (Regional Court of Appeal of Budapest), which upheld the order rejecting the registration. According to that court, a company which was incorporated and registered in Italy cannot, by virtue of Hungarian company law, transfer its seat to Hungary and cannot obtain registration there in the form requested. According to that court, under the Hungarian law in force, the only particulars which can be shown in the commercial register are those listed in Paragraphs 24 to 29 of Law V of 2006 and, consequently, a company which is not Hungarian cannot be listed as a predecessor in law.

VALE Építési brought an appeal on a point of law before the Legfelsőbb Bíróság (Supreme Court), seeking the annulment of the order rejecting registration and an order that the company be entered in the commercial register. It submits that the contested order infringes Articles 49 TFEU and 54 TFEU, which are directly applicable.

In that regard, it states that the order fails to recognise the fundamental difference between the international transfer of the seat of a company without changing the national law which governs that company, on the one hand, and the international conversion of a company, on the other. The Court clearly recognised that difference in Case C‑210/06 Cartesio[2008] ECR I‑9641.

    The referring court upheld the assessment by the Fővárosi Ítélőtábla and states that the transfer of the seat of a company governed by the law of another Member State, in this instance the Italian Republic, entailing the reincorporation of the company in accordance with Hungarian law and a reference to the original Italian company, as requested by VALE Építési, cannot be regarded as a conversion under Hungarian law, since national law on conversions applies only to domestic situations. However, it harbours doubts as to the compatibility of such legislation with the freedom of establishment, while stressing that the present case differs from the case which gave rise to the judgment in Cartesio, since what is at issue here is a transfer of the seat of a company with a change of the applicable national law, while maintaining the legal personality of the company, that is to say, a cross-border conversion.

      In those circumstances, the Legfelsőbb Bíróság decided to stay the proceedings and to refer the following questions to the Court of Justice for a preliminary ruling:

‘(1)      Must the host Member State pay due regard to Articles [49 TFEU and 54 TFEU] when a company established in another Member State (the Member State of origin) transfers its seat to that host Member State and, at the same time and for this purpose, deletes the entry regarding it in the commercial register in the Member State of origin, and the company’s owners adopt a new instrument of constitution under the laws of the host Member State, and the company applies for registration in the commercial register of the host Member State under the laws of the host Member State?

(2)      If the answer to the first question is yes, must Articles [49 TFEU and 54 TFEU] be interpreted in such a case as meaning that they preclude legislation or practices of such a (host) Member State which prohibit a company established lawfully in any other Member State (the Member State of origin) from transferring its seat to the host Member State and continuing to operate under the laws of that State?

(3)      With regard to the response to the second question, is the basis on which the host Member State prohibits the company from registration of any relevance, specifically:

–      if, in its instrument of constitution adopted in the host Member State, the company designates as its predecessor the company established and deleted from the commercial register in the Member State of origin, and applies for the predecessor to be registered as its own predecessor in the commercial register of the host Member State?

–      in the event of international conversion within the Community, when deciding on the company’s application for registration, must the host Member State take into consideration the instrument recording the fact of the transfer of company seat in the commercial register of the Member State of origin, and, if so, to what extent?

(4)      Is the host Member State entitled to decide on the application for company registration lodged in the host Member State by the company carrying out international conversion within the Community in accordance with the rules of company law of the host Member State as they relate to the conversion of domestic companies, and to require the company to fulfil all the conditions (e.g. drawing up lists of assets and liabilities and property inventories) laid down by the company law of the host Member State in respect of domestic conversion, or is the host Member State obliged under Articles [49 TFEU and 54 TFEU] to distinguish international conversion within the Community from domestic conversion and, if so, to what extent?’

JUDGEMENT

1.      Articles 49 TFEU and 54 TFEU must be interpreted as precluding national legislation which enables companies established under national law to convert, but does not allow, in a general manner, companies governed by the law of another Member State to convert to companies governed by national law by incorporating such a company.

2.      Articles 49 TFEU and 54 TFEU must be interpreted, in the context of cross-border company conversions, as meaning that the host Member State is entitled to determine the national law applicable to such operations and thus to apply the provisions of its national law on the conversion of national companies governing the incorporation and functioning of companies, such as the requirements relating to the drawing-up of lists of assets and liabilities and property inventories. However, the principles of equivalence and effectiveness, respectively, preclude the host Member State from

–        refusing, in relation to cross-border conversions, to record the company which has applied to convert as the ‘predecessor in law’, if such a record is made of the predecessor company in the commercial register for domestic conversions, and

–        refusing to take due account, when examining a company’s application for registration, of documents obtained from the authorities of the Member State of origin.

COMMENT:

This judgment shows that national legislation based on the doctrine of the real seat is not immune to the freedom of establisment.

Many thanks to Manuel Morán for this relevant post.

RESUMEN

La presente petición de decisión prejudicial se refiere al problema de la movilidad transfronteriza de las sociedades en el seno del mercado único. La petición planteada al Tribunal de Justicia versa sobre la interpretación de los artículos 43 CE y 48 CE (actualmente artículos 49 TFUE y 54 TFUE) y ha sido presentada en el marco de un procedimiento de jurisdicción voluntaria en relación con el desplazamiento transfronterizo de una sociedad italiana a Hungría mediante el traslado de su domicilio social, con cancelación de su inscripción en el Registro Mercantil italiano, cambio del Derecho aplicable y nueva constitución de una sociedad húngara que pretende ser la sucesora universal de dicha sociedad italiana.

La normativa húngara controvertida en el presente asunto permite inscribir en el Registro Mercantil nacional, como predecesora legal de una compañía, a una sociedad constituida en Hungría. En cambio, dicha normativa no permite la inscripción de esa mención si la predecesora es una sociedad constituida en otro Estado miembro, como sucede en el asunto principal.

El presente asunto se inscribe en el marco de una serie de sentencias del Tribunal de Justicia relativas al Derecho europeo de sociedades, tales como las sentencias Daily Mail and General Trust, Centros, Überseering, Inspire Art, SEVIC Systems y Cartesio. (2) No obstante, presenta un aspecto innovador, ya que se solicita al Tribunal de Justicia que se pronuncie sobre el alcance de las obligaciones del Estado miembro de acogida en caso de «nueva constitución transfronteriza de una sociedad de capital

LITIGIO PRINCIPAL Y CUESTIONES PREJUDICIALES

VALE Costruzioni Srl (sociedad italiana de responsabilidad limitada; en lo sucesivo, «VALE Costruzioni»), constituida mediante acta de 27 de septiembre de 2000, fue inscrita en el Registro Mercantil de Roma (Italia) el 16 de noviembre de 2000. El 3 de febrero de 2006, esta sociedad solicitó la cancelación de su inscripción registral indicando su intención de trasladar su domicilio social y su actividad a Hungría y de cesar su actividad en Italia. Atendiendo a esa solicitud, la autoridad encargada del Registro Mercantil de Roma canceló la inscripción registral de esta sociedad el 13 de febrero de 2006. De los autos se desprende que fue anotado en el registro, bajo el epígrafe «Cancelación registral y traslado de domicilio», que «la sociedad se ha trasladado a Hungría».

Dado que la sociedad constituida originariamente en Italia con arreglo a Derecho italiano había decidido trasladar su domicilio social a Hungría y operar conforme al Derecho húngaro, el gerente de VALE Costruzioni y otra persona física aprobaron el 14 de noviembre de 2006 en Roma los estatutos de VALE Építési Kft (sociedad húngara de responsabilidad limitada; en lo sucesivo, «VALE Építési»), con vistas a su inscripción en el Registro Mercantil húngaro. Además se desembolsó el capital requerido para el registro por la normativa húngara.

El 19 de enero de 2007, el representante de VALE Építési solicitó ante el Fővárosi Bíróság (órgano jurisdiccional de Budapest), en su condición de cégbíróság (Tribunal mercantil), la inscripción de la sociedad con arreglo al Derecho húngaro. En su solicitud, señaló que VALE Costruzioni era la predecesora legal de VALE Építési.

El Fővárosi Bíróság, en su condición de tribunal mercantil en primera instancia, denegó la solicitud de inscripción. En segunda instancia, el Fővárosi ítélőtábla (Tribunal regional de apelación de Budapest), ante el que VALE Építési interpuso recurso, confirmó la resolución denegatoria. Según ese órgano jurisdiccional, una sociedad constituida y registrada en Italia no puede, con arreglo a las normas húngaras aplicables en materia de sociedades, trasladar su domicilio social a Hungría y no cabe la inscripción de la forma solicitada. Añade que, según la normativa húngara en vigor, en el Registro Mercantil sólo pueden figurar las menciones enumeradas en los artículos 24 a 29 de la Ley nº V de 2006 y, en consecuencia, no es posible hacer constar como predecesora legal a una sociedad que no sea húngara.

VALE Építési interpuso un recurso de casación ante el Legfelsőbb Bíróság (Tribunal Supremo), solicitando que se anulara la resolución denegatoria y se ordenara la inscripción registral de la sociedad. La sociedad alega que la resolución impugnada infringe los artículos de aplicación directa 49 TFUE y 54 TFUE.

La sociedad señala al respecto que dicha resolución no tiene en cuenta la diferencia fundamental entre, por una parte, el traslado internacional del domicilio social de una sociedad sin cambio del derecho nacional aplicable y, por otra parte, la transformación internacional de una sociedad. Ahora bien, el Tribunal de Justicia reconoció claramente tal diferencia en su sentencia de 16 de diciembre de 2008, Cartesio (C‑210/06, Rec. p. I‑9641).

El órgano jurisdiccional remitente ha confirmado la apreciación del Fővárosi ítélőtábla y señala que el traslado del domicilio social de una sociedad que opera con arreglo al Derecho de otro Estado miembro, en el caso de autos la República Italiana, con una reconstitución de la sociedad según el Derecho húngaro y la mención de su causante italiana, tal como solicita VALE Építési, no puede admitirse en Derecho húngaro como transformación, pues la normativa nacional sobre transformaciones sólo se aplica a situaciones internas. Sin embargo, se pregunta sobre la compatibilidad de tal normativa con la libertad de establecimiento, señalando que el caso de autos se distingue del asunto en que se dictó la sentencia Cartesio, antes citada, en el sentido de que en el caso de autos se trata de un traslado del domicilio social de una sociedad con cambio del Derecho nacional aplicable, manteniendo la personalidad jurídica, es decir, de una transformación transfronteriza.

En estas circunstancias, el Legfelsőbb Bíróság decidió suspender el procedimiento y plantear al Tribunal de Justicia las siguientes cuestiones prejudiciales:

«1) ¿Tiene que atenerse el Estado miembro de acogida a los artículos [49 TFUE y 54 TFUE] en el supuesto de que una sociedad constituida en otro Estado miembro (de origen) traslade su domicilio social al Estado miembro de acogida y, simultáneamente, cancele a estos efectos su inscripción registral en el Estado miembro de origen, los accionistas de la sociedad otorguen una nueva escritura de constitución con arreglo al Derecho del Estado miembro de acogida y la sociedad solicite su inscripción en el Registro Mercantil del Estado miembro de acogida con arreglo al Derecho de dicho Estado?

2)      En caso de respuesta afirmativa a la primera cuestión ¿han de interpretarse los artículos [49 TFUE y 54 TFUE] en el sentido de que se oponen a una normativa o práctica de un Estado miembro (de acogida) que impide a una sociedad constituida legalmente en cualquier otro Estado miembro (de origen) trasladar su domicilio social al Estado miembro de acogida y continuar operando con arreglo al Derecho de este último Estado?

3)      A efectos de la respuesta a la segunda cuestión, ¿tiene relevancia cuál sea el motivo por el que el Estado miembro de acogida deniegue la inscripción de la sociedad en el Registro Mercantil? Concretamente:

–      Que, en la escritura de constitución recibida en el Estado de acogida, la sociedad solicitante haga constar como predecesora legal a la sociedad constituida en el Estado miembro de origen, cuya inscripción registral ha cancelado, y solicite que se mencione a dicha sociedad como su predecesora legal en el Registro Mercantil del Estado miembro de acogida.

–      En el supuesto de una transformación internacional intracomunitaria, a efectos de la resolución del Estado miembro de acogida acerca de la solicitud de inscripción de la sociedad en el Registro Mercantil, ¿está obligado el Estado miembro de acogida a tener en cuenta el acto por el que el Estado miembro de origen anotó en su Registro Mercantil el hecho del cambio de domicilio social y, en caso afirmativo, en qué medida?

4)      ¿Está legitimado el Estado miembro de acogida para resolver con arreglo a las disposiciones de su Derecho de sociedades que regulan las transformaciones societarias internas, acerca de la solicitud de inscripción en el Registro Mercantil de ese Estado formulada por una sociedad que realiza una transformación internacional intracomunitaria, exigiendo a dicha sociedad que cumpla todos los requisitos que establece el Derecho de sociedades del Estado miembro de acogida para las transformaciones internas (por ejemplo, la elaboración de un balance y de un inventario de los activos) o, por el contrario, está obligado, sobre la base de los artículos 49 TFUE y 54 TFUE, a diferenciar entre las transformaciones internacionales intracomunitarias y las transformaciones internas y, en caso afirmativo, en qué medida?»

FALLO

1)      Los artículos 49 TFUE y 54 TFUE deben interpretarse en el sentido de que se oponen a una normativa nacional que, a la vez que prevé para las sociedades nacionales la facultad de transformarse, no permite, de manera general, la transformación de una sociedad de otro Estado miembro en sociedad nacional mediante la constitución de esta última.

2)      Los artículos 49 TFUE y 54 TFUE deben interpretarse en el sentido de que, en el contexto de una transformación transfronteriza de una sociedad, el Estado miembro de acogida es competente para establecer el Derecho interno pertinente para tal operación y para aplicar de este modo las normas de su Derecho nacional sobre transformaciones internas que regulan la constitución y el funcionamiento de una sociedad, como el requisito de elaborar un balance y un inventario de activos. Sin embargo, los principios de equivalencia y de efectividad se oponen, respectivamente, a que el Estado miembro de acogida:

–        en las transformaciones transfronterizas, deniegue la inscripción de la sociedad que ha solicitado la transformación como «predecesora legal», si tal mención de la sociedad predecesora en el Registro Mercantil está prevista para transformaciones internas, y

–        se niegue a tener en cuenta debidamente los documentos procedentes de las autoridades del Estado miembro de origen en el procedimiento de registro de la sociedad.

COMENTARIO:

Esta sentencia muestra que la legislación nacional basada en la “teoría de la sede real” no resulta inmune a la libertad de establecimiento.

Muchas gracias a Manuel Morán Arias por este interesante post.

One thought on “M. Morán: ECJ VALE C‑378/10, Transfer of the seat of a company governed by the law of a Member State to another Member State with a change in the national law applicable – Transferencia de sede a otro Estado Miembro con modificación de la ley nacional aplicablectividad – Transformación transfronteriza

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s