ECJ C-35/11 Test Claimants in the FII Group Litigation – Doble imposición económica, libertad de establecimiento y libre circulación de capitales

ECJ Judgement of 13 November 2012 in Case C‑35/11, Test Claimants in the FII Group Litigation

Sentencia del TJUE de 13 de noviembre de 2012 en el Asunto C-35/11 Test Claimants in the FII Group Litigation

Trending topic: Economic Double Taxation and Economic Freedoms – Doble imposición económica y libertades económicas

Introductory comment:

This relevant judgment tries to clarify the answers given by the former ECJ judgment of 13 December 2006 (Test Claimants in the FII Group Litigation, C‑446/04). The issues are of great complexity and cannot be sufficiently addressed in an ordinary post, but we would like to highlight a couple of ideas:

a) The Court considers that “Articles 49 TFEU [freedom of establishment] and 63 TFEU [free movement of capital] require a Member State which has a system for preventing economic double taxation as regards dividends paid to residents by resident companies to accord equivalent treatment to dividends paid to residents by non-resident companies” (paragraph 38). In order to assess if an exemption method and a credit method are or not equivalent, the national court should take into account not only the nominal rate of tax the effective levels of taxation under ordinary circumstances (paragraph 49).

b) “National rules relating to the tax treatment of dividends from a third country which do not apply exclusively to situations in which the parent company exercises decisive influence over the company paying the dividends must be assessed in the light of Article 63 TFEU. A company resident in a Member State may therefore rely on that provision in order to call into question the legality of such rules, irrespective of the size of its shareholding in the company paying dividends established in a third country (see, to this effect, A, paragraphs 11 and 27), [paragraph 99].

c) “It is to be remembered that the right to a refund of charges levied by a Member State in breach of European Union law is the consequence and complement of the rights conferred on individuals by provisions of European Union law prohibiting such charges. The Member State is therefore required in principle to repay charges levied in breach of European Union law (Case C‑398/09 Lady & Kid and Others [2011] ECR I-0000, paragraph 17 and the case-law cited)”, [paragraph 84].

In our view these findings are coherent with previous case-law, but they also show a satisfactory evolution aimed to grant the fundamental freedoms when complex national tax provisions are at stake.

Questions referred by the High Court of Justice of England and Wales:

‘1. Do the references to “tax rates” and “different levels of taxation” at paragraph 56 of the [judgment in Test Claimants in the FII Group Litigation]:

(a) refer solely to statutory or nominal rates of tax; or

(b) refer to the effective rates of tax paid as well as the statutory or nominal rates of tax; or

(c) do the phrases referred to have some different meaning and, if so, what?

2. Does it make any difference to the Court’s answer to Questions 2 and 4 of the reference in [Test Claimants in the FII Group Litigation] if:

(a) foreign corporation tax is not (or not wholly) paid by the non-resident company paying the dividend to the resident company, but that dividend is paid from profits comprising dividends paid by its direct or indirect subsidiary resident in a Member State and which were paid out of profits on which tax has been paid in that State; and/or

(b) [ACT] is not paid by the resident company which receives the dividend from a non-resident company, but is paid by its direct or indirect resident parent company upon the further distribution of the profits of the recipient company that directly or indirectly comprise the dividend?

3. In the circumstances described in Question 2(b) …, does the company paying the ACT have a claim for the repayment of the tax unduly levied (San Giorgio …) or only a claim for damages (Brasserie du Pêcheur and Factortame …)?

4. Where the national legislation in question does not apply exclusively to situations in which the parent company exercises decisive influence over the dividend paying company, can a resident company rely upon Article 63 TFEU … in respect of dividends received from a subsidiary over which it exercises decisive influence and which is resident in a third country?

5. Does the Court’s answer to Question 3 of the reference in [Test Claimants in the FII Group Litigation] also apply where the non-resident subsidiaries to which no surrender could be made are not subject to tax in the Member State of the parent company?’

Ruling: “1. Articles 49 TFEU and 63 TFEU must be interpreted as precluding legislation of a Member State which applies the exemption method to nationally-sourced dividends and the imputation method to foreign-sourced dividends if it is established, first, that the tax credit to which the company receiving the dividends is entitled under the imputation method is equivalent to the amount of tax actually paid on the profits underlying the distributed dividends and, second, that the effective level of taxation of company profits in the Member State concerned is generally lower than the prescribed nominal rate of tax.

2. The answers given by the Court to the second and fourth questions asked in the case which gave rise to the judgment of 12 December 2006 in Case C-446/04 Test Claimants in the FII Group Litigation also apply where:

the foreign corporation tax to which the profits underlying the distributed dividends have been subject was not or was not wholly paid by the non-resident company paying those dividends to the resident company, but was paid by a company resident in a Member State that is a direct or indirect subsidiary of the first company;

advance corporation tax has not been paid by the resident company which receives the dividends from a non-resident company, but was paid by its resident parent company under a group income election.

3. European Union law must be interpreted as meaning that a parent company resident in a Member State, which in the context of a group taxation scheme, such as the group income election at issue in the main proceedings, has, in breach of the rules of European Union law, been compelled to pay advance corporation tax on the part of the profits from foreign-sourced dividends, may bring an action for repayment of that unduly levied tax in so far as it exceeds the additional corporation tax which the Member State in question was entitled to levy in order to make up for the lower nominal rate of tax to which the profits underlying the foreign-sourced dividends were subject compared with the nominal rate of tax applicable to the profits of the resident parent company.

4. European Union law must be interpreted as meaning that a company that is resident in a Member State and has a shareholding in a company resident in a third country giving it definite influence over the decisions of the latter company and enabling it to determine its activities may rely upon Article 63 TFEU in order to call into question the consistency with that provision of legislation of that Member State which relates to the tax treatment of dividends originating in the third country and does not apply exclusively to situations in which the parent company exercises decisive influence over the company paying the dividends.

5. The reply given by the Court to the third question asked in the case which gave rise to the judgment in Test Claimants in the FII Group Litigation does not apply where the subsidiaries established in other Member States to which advance corporation tax could not be surrendered are not subject to tax in the Member State of the parent company”.

Comentario previo:

Esta importante sentencia intenta aclarar las respuestas ofrecidas por la anterior sentencia del TJUE de 13 de diciembre de 2006 (Test Claimants in the FII Group Litigation, C‑446/04). Se trata de cuestiones muy complejas que no podemos abordar en este post con la profundidad que sería necesaria. Por ello nos limitaremos a destacar tres ideas:

a) El Tribunal considera que “los artículos 49 TFUE [libertad de establecimiento] y 63 TFUE [libre circulación de capitales] obligan a un Estado miembro que dispone de un sistema para evitar la doble imposición económica en el supuesto de dividendos que los residentes perciben de sociedades residentes, a conceder un trato equivalente a los dividendos que los residentes perciben de sociedades no residentes (párrafo 38). Para determinar si el método de exención y el de imputación son equivalentes, el tribunal nacional no sólo debe tener en cuenta el tipo nominal, sino el tipo efectivo determinado con arreglo al criterio de la generalidad de los casos (párrafo 49).

b) “national rules relating to the tax treatment of dividends from a third country which do not apply exclusively to situations in which the parent company exercises decisive influence over the company paying the dividends must be assessed in the light of Article 63 TFEU. A company resident in a Member State may therefore rely on that provision in order to call into question the legality of such rules, irrespective of the size of its shareholding in the company paying dividends established in a third country” [párrafo 99].

c) “El derecho a obtener la devolución de los tributos recaudados en un Estado miembro infringiendo el Derecho de la Unión es la consecuencia y el complemento de los derechos conferidos a los justiciables por las disposiciones del Derecho de la Unión que prohíben tales tributos. Por lo tanto, en principio, el Estado miembro está obligado a devolver los tributos recaudados contraviniendo lo dispuesto en el Derecho de la Unión (véase la sentencia de 6 de septiembre de 2011, Lady & Kid y otros, C‑398/09, Rec. p. I‑0000, apartado 17 y la jurisprudencia citada)” [paragraph 84].

En nuestra opinión estas afirmaciones son coherentes con la jurisprudencia anterior, pero muestran también una satisfactoria evolución dirigida a garantizar la aplicación de las libertades fundamentales cuando entran en juego normas tributarias nacionales de gran complejidad.

Cuestiones planteadas por la High Court of Justice (England & Wales):

«1) Las referencias al “tipo impositivo” y a los “distintos niveles impositivos” en el apartado 56 de la sentencia Test Claimants in the FII Group Litigation, antes citada:

a) ¿aluden exclusivamente a los tipos impositivos legales o nominales, o

b) aluden tanto a los tipos efectivos de impuesto abonado como a los tipos impositivos legales o nominales, o

c) tienen dichas expresiones un significado diferente y, en dicho caso, cuál?

2) ¿Sería distinta la respuesta del Tribunal de Justicia a las cuestiones prejudiciales segunda y cuarta planteadas en el asunto [que dio lugar a la sentencia Test Claimants in the FII Group Litigation, antes citada] si:

a) el impuesto sobre sociedades extranjero no es (o no es totalmente) pagado por la sociedad no residente que abona dividendos a la sociedad residente, dividendos repartidos con cargo a beneficios que comprenden dividendos pagados por su filial directa o indirecta residente en un Estado miembro y que se han repartido con cargo a beneficios por los que se ha abonado el impuesto en dicho Estado, y/o

b) el [ACT] no es abonado por la sociedad residente que percibe los dividendos de una sociedad no residente, sino por su sociedad matriz residente directa o indirecta con motivo de la distribución posterior de los beneficios de la sociedad beneficiaria que comprenden directa o indirectamente los dividendos?

3) En las circunstancias descritas en la letra b) de la segunda cuestión prejudicial, ¿tiene derecho la sociedad que abona el ACT a formular una reclamación de devolución del impuesto indebidamente recaudado (sentencia San Giorgio[, antes citada]) o sólo una reclamación de indemnización por daños y perjuicios (sentencia Brasserie du Pêcheur y Factortame[, antes citada])?

4) Cuando la legislación nacional controvertida no sea aplicable exclusivamente a situaciones en las que la sociedad matriz ejerce una influencia determinante sobre la sociedad que reparte el dividendo, ¿puede una sociedad residente invocar el artículo 63 TFUE con respecto a los dividendos percibidos de una filial sobre la que ejerce una influencia determinante y que es residente en un tercer país?

5) La respuesta del Tribunal de Justicia a la tercera cuestión prejudicial planteada en el asunto [que dio lugar a la sentencia Test Claimants in the FII Group Litigation, antes citada,] ¿resulta aplicable también cuando las filiales no residentes a las que no se ha podido realizar transferencia alguna no están sujetas al impuesto en el Estado miembro de la sociedad matriz?”.

Fallo:

“1) Los artículos 49 TFUE y 63 TFUE deben interpretarse en el sentido de que se oponen a una legislación de un Estado miembro que aplica el método de exención a los dividendos de origen nacional y el método de imputación a los dividendos de origen extranjero, si se acredita, por un lado, que el crédito fiscal de que disfruta la sociedad beneficiaria de los dividendos en el marco del método de imputación es equivalente a la cuantía del impuesto efectivamente pagado por los beneficios subyacentes a los dividendos repartidos y, por otro, que el nivel efectivo de tributación de los beneficios de las sociedades en el Estado miembro de que se trate es generalmente inferior al tipo impositivo nominal establecido.

2) Las respuestas aportadas por el Tribunal de Justicia a las cuestiones prejudiciales segunda y cuarta planteadas en el marco del asunto que dio lugar a la sentencia de 12 de diciembre de 2006, Test Claimants in the FII Group Litigation (C‑446/04), también son válidas cuando:

El impuesto sobre sociedades extranjero aplicado a los beneficios subyacentes a los dividendos repartidos no fue –o no fue totalmente– pagado por la sociedad no residente que abona dichos dividendos a la sociedad residente, sino por una sociedad que reside en un Estado miembro, filial directa o indirecta de la primera sociedad.

El pago a cuenta del impuesto sobre sociedades no lo pagó la sociedad residente que percibe los dividendos de una sociedad no residente, sino su sociedad matriz residente en el marco de la tributación en régimen de grupo.

3) El Derecho de la Unión debe interpretarse en el sentido de que una sociedad matriz residente en un Estado miembro que, en el marco de la tributación en régimen de grupo, como la controvertida en el litigio principal, fue obligada, infringiendo las normas del Derecho de la Unión, a abonar el pago a cuenta del impuesto sobre sociedades por la parte de los beneficios procedentes de dividendos de origen extranjero puede formular una reclamación de devolución de dicho impuesto indebidamente recaudado en la medida en que éste exceda el incremento del impuesto sobre sociedades que el Estado miembro de que se trate podía exigir para compensar el tipo impositivo nominal inferior que se aplicó a los beneficios subyacentes a los dividendos de origen extranjero respecto del tipo impositivo nominal aplicable a los beneficios de la sociedad matriz residente.

4) El Derecho de la Unión debe interpretarse en el sentido de que una sociedad residente en un Estado miembro y titular de una participación en una sociedad residente en un tercer país que le confiere una influencia real en las decisiones de esta última sociedad y le permite determinar sus actividades puede invocar el artículo 63 TFUE para cuestionar la conformidad con esta disposición de una legislación del referido Estado miembro relativa al tratamiento fiscal de dividendos originarios de dicho tercer país, que no es aplicable exclusivamente a las situaciones en las que la sociedad matriz ejerce una influencia determinante en la sociedad que reparte los dividendos.

5) La respuesta aportada por el Tribunal de Justicia a la tercera cuestión prejudicial planteada en el asunto que dio lugar a la sentencia Test Claimants in the FII Group Litigation, antes citada, no resulta aplicable cuando las filiales establecidas en otros Estados miembros a las que no se ha podido realizar transferencia alguna del pago a cuenta del impuesto sobre sociedades no están sujetas al impuesto en el Estado miembro de la sociedad matriz”.

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 450 other followers